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FAQs: phCMV Mammalian Expression Vectors

FAQs: phCMV Mammalian Expression Vectors

1. What are the phCMV vectors?
2. How many different phCMV vectors are available?
3. What are the advantages of the phCMV vectors?
4. Can I use the phCMV vectors for making stable transfectants?
5. What antibody do you recommend for detection of HA fusion proteins?
6. In the phCMV vectors, where are the TATAA box, the start of transcription, the intron located?

1. What are the phCMV vectors?

The phCMV vectors are a family of versatile mammalian expression vectors that utilize a uniquely modified CMV promoter to produce the highest levels of transgene expression available (up to 10X the expression levels of other commercially-available CMV promoter-based vectors).

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2. How many different phCMV vectors are available?

Three phCMV vectors are available for generating high-level stable and transient transgene expression in mammalian cells. The phCMV1 vector is designed for native protein expression, while the phCMV2 and phCMV3 vectors are designed for expression of HA fusion proteins. Such fusion proteins can be easily detected or purified using anti-HA antibodies or anti-HA coupled chromatography columns.

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3. What are the advantages of the phCMV vectors?

The primary advantage of the phCMV vectors is that they contain a highly optimized CMV promoter, which has been systematically modified to produce the highest levels of transgene expression available (up to 5x higher than other CMV promoter-based mammalian expression vectors). Second, the phCMV vectors offer the flexibility of native protein expression (phCMV1), N-terminal HA fusion protein expression (phCMV2), or C-terminal HA fusion protein expression (phCMV3). Third, the phCMV vectors are very small and ideal for transfection because of their dual-use kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene and simplified backbone. Forth, in conjuction with the combination kanamycin/neomycin gene, the rigorously engineered backbones of the phCMV vectors allow for a smaller vector, providing greater transfection efficiency, high plasmid yield in E. coli, and enhanced expression levels in vitro and in vivo.

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4. Can I use the phCMV vectors for making stable transfectants?

Yes. The phCMV vectors contain a neomycin resistance gene for creation of stable transfectants using G418. A detailed protocol for stable transfection is included in the phCMV manual.

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5. What antibody do you recommend for detection of HA fusion proteins?

For low background detection of HA fusion proteins, we recommend our Anti-HA and Anti-HA-HRP Polyclonal Antibodies. Click here to learn more information about these antibodies.

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6. In the phCMV vectors, what are the locations of the TATAA box, the start of transcription, the intron?

The TATAA box is located at 556-561, the start of transcription is located at 584, and the intron is located at 705-808 (phCMV1 & phCMV3), and 705-794 (phCMV2).

 
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FAQs: phCMV Mammalian Expression Vectors
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FAQs: phCMV Mammalian Expression Vectors

1. What are the phCMV vectors?
2. How many different phCMV vectors are available?
3. What are the advantages of the phCMV vectors?
4. Can I use the phCMV vectors for making stable transfectants?
5. What antibody do you recommend for detection of HA fusion proteins?
6. In the phCMV vectors, where are the TATAA box, the start of transcription, the intron located?

1. What are the phCMV vectors?

The phCMV vectors are a family of versatile mammalian expression vectors that utilize a uniquely modified CMV promoter to produce the highest levels of transgene expression available (up to 10X the expression levels of other commercially-available CMV promoter-based vectors).

[ back to top ]

2. How many different phCMV vectors are available?

Three phCMV vectors are available for generating high-level stable and transient transgene expression in mammalian cells. The phCMV1 vector is designed for native protein expression, while the phCMV2 and phCMV3 vectors are designed for expression of HA fusion proteins. Such fusion proteins can be easily detected or purified using anti-HA antibodies or anti-HA coupled chromatography columns.

[ back to top ]

3. What are the advantages of the phCMV vectors?

The primary advantage of the phCMV vectors is that they contain a highly optimized CMV promoter, which has been systematically modified to produce the highest levels of transgene expression available (up to 5x higher than other CMV promoter-based mammalian expression vectors). Second, the phCMV vectors offer the flexibility of native protein expression (phCMV1), N-terminal HA fusion protein expression (phCMV2), or C-terminal HA fusion protein expression (phCMV3). Third, the phCMV vectors are very small and ideal for transfection because of their dual-use kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene and simplified backbone. Forth, in conjuction with the combination kanamycin/neomycin gene, the rigorously engineered backbones of the phCMV vectors allow for a smaller vector, providing greater transfection efficiency, high plasmid yield in E. coli, and enhanced expression levels in vitro and in vivo.

[ back to top ]

4. Can I use the phCMV vectors for making stable transfectants?

Yes. The phCMV vectors contain a neomycin resistance gene for creation of stable transfectants using G418. A detailed protocol for stable transfection is included in the phCMV manual.

[ back to top ]

5. What antibody do you recommend for detection of HA fusion proteins?

For low background detection of HA fusion proteins, we recommend our Anti-HA and Anti-HA-HRP Polyclonal Antibodies. Click here to learn more information about these antibodies.

[ back to top ]

6. In the phCMV vectors, what are the locations of the TATAA box, the start of transcription, the intron?

The TATAA box is located at 556-561, the start of transcription is located at 584, and the intron is located at 705-808 (phCMV1 & phCMV3), and 705-794 (phCMV2).

 
[ back to top ]

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